Proper selection, installation, inspection and maintenance of your appliances is extremely important in reducing your exposure to indoor pollutants. Providing good ventilation in your home and correctly using your appliance can also reduce your exposure . The Consumer Product Safety Commission recommends a detector on each floor of every residence. At a minimum, a detector should be placed on each sleeping floor, with an additional detector in the area of any major gas burning appliances such as a furnace or water heater. Choose appliances that vent their fumes to the outside whenever possible, have them properly installed, and maintain them according to manufacturers’ instructions. Don't ignore symptoms, particularly if more than one person is experiencing them.

 

   
   
   
 
 
Checklist for the Prevention of Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning
National Center for Environmental Health

How often should I have my fireplace draft and the drafts of other fuel-burning appliances checked?
Every year. Have all fuel-burning venting systems in your home checked by an expert every year.

How often should my gas appliances be checked?
Every year. Have all gas appliances checked every year. Your gas company may be willing to do this for you.

Do all gas appliances need to be vented?
Yes. All gas appliances must be vented so that CO will not build up in your home, cabin, or camper.

VIEW ENTIRE ARTICLE

 
What You Should Know About Combustion Appliances and Indoor Air Pollution
U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

Proper selection, installation, inspection and maintenance of your appliances are extremely important in reducing your exposure to these pollutants. Providing good ventilation in your home and correctly using your appliance can also reduce your exposure to these pollutants.

Additionally, there are several different residential carbon monoxide detectors for sale. The CPSC is encouraging the development of detectors that will provide maximum protection. These detectors would warn consumers of harmful carbon monoxide levels in the home. They may soon be widely available to reduce deaths from carbon monoxide poisoning.

VIEW ENTIRE ARTICLE

 
New Standard For Carbon Monoxide Detectors
U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

WASHINGTON, DC -- A new standard for carbon monoxide detectors can help prevent the more than 200 estimated deaths each year attributed to residential carbon monoxide poisoning. (A more recent review claims CO as the leading cause of more than 15,000 accidental poisoning deaths in the United States each year and another 10,000 injuries according to the Carbon Monoxide Medical Association)  The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and Underwriters Laboratories Inc. (UL) today announced the publication of a new voluntary standard (UL Standard for Safety 2034 "Single- and Multiple-Station Carbon Monoxide Detectors") for residential carbon monoxide detectors. CPSC and UL recommend that consumers look for, purchase, and install carbon monoxide detectors that have labels showing that the detectors meet the requirements of the new UL standard.

VIEW ENTIRE ARTICLE

 
HOME SAFETY SPOTLIGHT
U.S Consumer Product Safety Commission
Carbon monoxide (CO) clues you can see:
  • Rusting or water streaking on vent/chimney
  • Loose or missing furnace panel
  • Sooting
  • Loose or disconnected vent/chimney connections
  • Debris or soot falling from chimney, fireplace or appliance
  • Loose masonry on chimney
  • Moisture inside of windows

Carbon monoxide (CO) clues you cannot see:

  • Internal appliance damage or malfunctioning components
  • Improper burner adjustment
  • Hidden blockage or damage in chimneys

 

VIEW ENTIRE ARTICLE

 
How many carbon monoxide detectors should I have and where should I place them?
H. Brandon Guest and Hamel Volunteer Fire Department

The Consumer Product Safety Commission recommends a detector on each floor of a residence. At a minimum, a single detector should be placed on each sleeping floor with an additional detector in the area of any major gas burning appliances such as a furnace or water heater. Installation in these areas ensures rapid detection of any potentially malfunctioning appliances and the ability to hear the alarm from all sleeping areas. In general, carbon monoxide detectors should be placed high (near the ceiling) for most effective use. Detectors should also not be placed within five feet of gas fueled appliances or near cooking or bathing areas. Consult the manufacturers installation instructions for proper placement of a detector within a given area.

VIEW ENTIRE ARTICLE

 
Protect Your Family and Yourself from Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
Environmental Protection Agency

DO choose appliances that vent their fumes to the outside whenever possible, have them properly installed, and maintain them according to manufacturers’ instructions.

DON’T ignore symptoms, particularly if more than one person is feeling them. You could lose consciousness and die if you do nothing.

VIEW ENTIRE ARTICLE

 
 
TOP OF PAGE

Copyright 2007 AboutCarbonMonoxide.com

CONTACT US

SUBMIT ARTICLE

LEGAL NOTICE